Online Market Research Sample

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LATAM Sample 101: The Importance of Race and Socio-Economic Status

Increasing competition in the U.S. has some brands seeking new markets, including those south of the border. More widespread internet access in Latin America has opened a gateway to growth for companies looking to do business in LATAM. But some brands are stumbling through the learning curve of understanding the region’s consumers. One of the biggest challenges has been dealing with pre-conceived notions about Race and Socio- Economic status in LATAM, which differs from classifications done in the U.S.

Rethink River Sampling, It Just May Be The Savior of Your Panel Recruitment Strategy

In the past, the source of panelists for sample was highly scrutinized. We’d get questions like, “Are they recruited from social media?” If there were, many would reject the sample in favor of other sources they deemed more credible. So stringent where sample procurement departments at that time that they even questioned incentives. For example, I remember working with a retailer who did not want to work with our panel because we offered incentives from a competitive retailer. They thought it would skew the results.

Socio-Economic Levels in Mexico: Explained

Targeting respondents utilizing socio-economic levels for the sample industry is a ubiquitous practice. Defining socio-economic levels in the U.S. is relatively straightforward. A combination of income and education are the most typical factors used in almost all market research studies. On occasion, some studies add a couple more factors but rarely exceed 3-4 elements. However, defining socio-economic levels in Mexico is much more complicated. As the sample and market research industry continues to grow in Mexico and the rest of Latin America, understanding how socio-economic levels are defined in the region will play a critical role in being successful in winning and fulfilling Mexican market research sample requests.

Innovations in Survey Methodologies and the Impact on Hispanic Sample

Modern market research has seen four major phases of quantitative survey data collection. During that time, we saw representative samples of U.S. Hispanics emerge and take root in mainstream market research. Let’s take a closer at the evolution of quantitative research and how innovation in the field impacted the widespread use of Hispanic sample.

3 Critical Facts About Online Market Research Respondents in Colombia

Latin America is betting on its thriving entrepreneurial culture to drive innovation in the region to modernize its way of life. Like Argentina and Peru, Colombia is becoming known as a hub for tech start-ups, stimulating the economy and making it an attractive tourist destination. This steady increase in economic growth has made Colombia more appealing to multinational brands while cultivating domestic brands preparing to export goods around the world. With increased entrepreneurial and economic activity also comes a growing demand for market research. We recently launched the DigaYGane panel in Colombia to great success. Having been there for some time now, we’d like to share three key facts about online market research respondents in Colombia that we have learned so far

What A Surge In Mexico E-Commerce Will Mean For LatAm Sample Demand

Mexico will be the fastest-growing e-commerce market in Latin America over the next five years. Fitch Solutions predicts average annual sales growth of 14.6% year-over-year from 2018 to 2022, driven, in part, by Mexico’s favorable consumer demographics, who are young ambitious and becoming more affluent.

Programmatic 3.0: The Rise of Respondents

Research Live published a thought-provoking article by JD Deitch in February 2018 entitled “Programmatic 2.0: The Future of Sample.” He aptly broke down the role automation has played in the history of sample into two distinct phases: 1.0 to 2.0. Deitch shares: “Programmatic 1.0 did two things very well: it has made us quicker and more cost-effective”. […]and how, “Programmatic 2.0 can vastly improve the accuracy and reliability of our data and our operational dependability.” His point being that programmatic 1.0 helped the sample industry become more efficient in bidding and programmatic 2.0 put the respondent back at the center of the sample process, implementing algorithms that will filter good survey experiences from bad survey experiences in real-time and adjust accordingly.

Interest in Hispanic Panels Heating Up In MR Industry

Strategic acquisitions can play a big role in corporate growth strategy. And recently, we’ve seen a number of them in the market research industry, especially in the panel sector. Since GfK Knowledge Network’s acquisition of Garcia Research’s Hispanic panel, Cada Cabeza, in 2010, there have been several large companies acquiring Hispanic panels to bolster their Hispanic sample offerings. Nielsen, Research Now, and most recently, Maru/Blue’s acquisition of the Hispanic panel, Tú Cuentas, just to name a few. So, what’s driving this growing interest in Hispanic panels?

Innovation vs. Disruption in the Insights Industry: Semantics Matter

Last week, I was honored to speak at IIeX2018 NA in Atlanta. We presented a paper on a study that investigates whether there is a better way to drive television return on investment (ROI) with Hispanics at a time when television viewership is declining, and digital and social media usage is ubiquitous among Hispanics. Given lleX’s focus on innovation, our presentation, for some, may not have checked all the boxes, especially for those who only see innovation through the lens of technology. But innovation isn’t inexorably linked to technology. Innovation in the insights industry can reference methodology, sampling, survey design, business models, and much more.

Brands Spend Billions Annually To Reach Hispanic Market; Is The Investment Misplaced?

There’s no doubt about it: the face of marketing has transformed over the last 20 years. Yet, for more than three decades, marketing to U.S. Hispanics has undergone little change; Spanish-language television still represents the bulk of U.S. Hispanic media spend, even though digital media use is now ubiquitous among Hispanics while television viewership is declining. There is a new study in the Journal of Cultural Marketing Strategy, “Nativity-based view: A new audience measurement standard that drives television return on investment for U.S. Hispanics” authored by Dr. Jake Beniflah, Brian Hughes, and myself, has revealed a major opportunity for brands to improve results when marketing to U.S.-born vs. foreign born Hispanics.