Integrated Market Research

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You’re Not Steve Jobs: 5 Reasons Your Client Needs Multicultural Research

Steve Jobs was a genius. He could envision and bring to market revolutionary products that set the standards in their industries. He was also known for relying on his intuition over market research. Due to the success of Apple, many people subscribe to this logic and opt-out of conducting market research. But there was only one Steve Jobs. The marketplace is littered with failed products and services that seemed like a good idea to their creators and were rushed to market only to find that no one asked for or needed them. Complicating matters further is an unprecedented demographic shift towards multiculturalism that is changing the composition of the U.S. consumer market. In business, intuition can be useful, but it needs to be optimized by market research, especially when attempting to tap into diverse markets. If you’re not advising your clients to conduct market research, you are doing them a disservice as they don’t have the facts to make informed decisions about their marketing strategy.

Linear TV Viewership Drops Nearly 50% As Streaming Services Ramp Up In 2019

Despite losing subscribers for the first time in the past eight years, Netflix is still the preferred method used for watching TV programs among U.S. consumers, followed closely by YouTube. Preferred by 61% of consumers for the past two years, the streaming giant’s dominance hasn’t been marked so much by growth as it has been by the drastic decline of Live TV across 2017, 2018, and 2019. In a matter of 3 years, linear television went from 68% in viewership down to 36%.

Can Marketers Get Around Marijuana’s Stigma?

Last month, Illinois became the 11th state to allow the adult use of recreational marijuana and the first state legislature to legalize selling it. The legal distribution of marijuana at the state level has prompted many blue-chip companies to explore cannabis-based products. So, who are the early players?

Americans Still Unsure About Cannabis, But CPG Brands See Opportunity

Last month, Illinois became the 11th state to allow the adult use of recreational marijuana. Its state legislature is the first to legalize selling the drug. Marijuana remains illegal at the federal level, for now. But that hasn’t stopped blue chip companies from exploring cannabis-based products as many believe that federal legalization in the U.S. is only a few votes away.

The ThinkNow Research Team: Expertise To Power Your Brand

Attracting and engaging consumers paves the road to sales and revenue for companies. Of these consumers, one segment, in particular, will represent more than 50% of the total consumer base within the next 20 years. For companies focusing on younger consumers ages 18-29, this consumer will be more than 50% of all consumers in less than ten years. Chances are, your company, like most, doesn’t understand these consumers despite the significant impact they will have on your company in the future. So, how do you gain insight into an audience with so much potential yet no relationship with your brand? Would you turn to a company focused solely on this consumer or one with a department, or more realistically, a person that heads up a division within a large organization?

If The U.S. Economy Is So Good, Why Are Sales Down?

“A rising tide raises all ships.” We’ve all heard that expression and many companies are hoping it’s true as the U.S. economy experiences the lowest unemployment rate and the longest period of growth in U.S. history. Under such circumstances, we could reasonably expect all our ships to be riding high, right? Not quite. In fact, many companies are struggling and wondering why they’re not experiencing the growth they believe they should be. As a consumer insights company that works across multiple verticals and consumer segments, we have a good vantage point from which to observe the rise and fall of the tides and the individual ships trying to stay afloat. Take a closer look and ask yourself these questions:

[INFOGRAPHIC] The Future of Vehicle Ownership

The rise of micro-mobility and auto technology has changed the landscape of transportation, but a few things remain the same. Consumers still prefer to shop for vehicles in-person and they want to own their cars. These insights and more are found in the ThinkNow 2019 Auto Purchase Trends Report which takes a closer look at vehicle purchases, purchase preferences, and the impact of technology on the industry.

If You’re Not Doing Multicultural Research, Then You’re Not Doing Research

Amplifying the voice of the multicultural consumer is at the heart of what we do at ThinkNow. Our research studies dig deeply into this multifaceted audience to uncover the cultural nuances that make them unique and the impact acculturation has had on immigrant communities. We believe in the power of this data, and often reach out to companies who have never interacted with us when the research impacts their business directly. A common objection we get from cold outreach calls is, “sorry, but we don’t do multicultural research.” That response stings. To say that you’re not willing to get to know over a quarter of the U.S. population is both offensive and tragic, because not only does it send a message that you don’t care, but it’s just bad business.

The Future of Vehicle Ownership: 2019 Purchase Trends

Autonomous Driving and Micro-Mobility Gaining Ground With Consumers It has been two years since we released our last report on auto purchase trends. While 2017 doesn’t seem like that long ago, a lot has changed in the automotive industry. Back then, Lyft was still a private company and Bird was a scrappy start-up. Tesla autopilot wasn’t really autopilot, and Ford was still making sedans. The change in the automotive, and more broadly, the transportation segment since then has been nothing short of amazing. In response to the changes, we’ve released our 2019 Auto Purchase Trends Report which takes a closer look at vehicle purchases, purchase preferences, and the impact of technology on the industry.

Cultural Values: Key Insights On How To Reach Asian Americans Effectively

As a market research company with a robust multicultural practice, we’re often asked about how to market to Asian Americans. Often, clients have heard that Asian Americans are wealthier and better educated than other groups and they want to tap into these appealing consumers. However, when we walk them through the different country of origin groups and languages spoken, they’re often surprised by the variety and complexity within this market. One way to simplify the discussion is to look at shared cultural values and craft messages that can be adapted to various subgroups within the Asian American community.