Hispanic Online Research

/Hispanic Online Research
­

Cultivating Hispanic Basketball Fans Scores Points On, Off The Court

U.S .Hispanics make up about 17% of the NBA fan base, according to the NBA Latin America. That’s roughly 15 million Hispanic basketball fans poised to enact significant influence over one of the country’s most revered sports. Several factors about this thriving demographic make it an attractive target for the League. U.S. Hispanics are younger, concentrated in urban areas, and have been integral to the evolution of popular cultural cornerstones such as hip-hop, which help shape the NBA brand we love today. Hispanic population defined by its youth.

The Great Latinx Debate

The term “Latinx” is trending and has seen a steady uptick in search over the past two years, peaking in 2019: It is during this “Latinx apex” that we decided to take a closer look at how popular the term “Latinx” really is among U.S. Hispanics and if it has staying power. Defining Latinx So what is Latinx? According to Merriam-Webster: Latinx was originally formed in the early aughts as a word for those of Latin American descent who do not identify as being of the male or female gender or who simply don’t want to be identified by gender. More than likely, there was little consideration for how it was supposed to be pronounced when it was created.

Hispanic Biculturalism Reinvents Seafood Industry : Mariscos

Did you know biculturalism is influencing the Seafood industry in the United States? Have you heard about Mariscos? As Latino restaurateurs continue to push through the hurdles of entrepreneurship, some of them are using this opportunity to alter the landscape of the traditional Hispanic food cuisine in an effort to go mainstream, and in turn, create foods that might be a more accurate reflection of their own American bi-cultural experience. One food segment that has been growing steadily over the past decade is the seafood industry or also known as ‘Mariscos’.

ThinkNow Hispanic Sample Evangelists! The Why Behind the Buy

We are excited to launch our Hispanic Sample Evangelists series where we feature dynamic brands who have entrusted ThinkNow with their Hispanic sample needs. In this first installment, we interviewed April Lainez, Brand Manager for the health and beauty brand, DLC Laboratories.

2019 Women’s World Cup, A Marketing Opportunity For Hispanic Food Products

With the goal of reaching a viewership of one billion, the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France holds represents an incredible marketing opportunity for Hispanic food products. This year’s tournament, which began on June 7 and ends on July 7, is the most exciting Women’s World Cup yet for several reasons: France is still buzzing from their 2017 Men’s World Cup win, while the U.S. women’s team is heavily favored to win this year. Toss in some intense, off-the-field conversations about gender equality, and it’s easy to see why interest in the games is at an all-time high.

2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup: How Marketers Can Get In the Game

With a goal of one billion viewers, the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France holds untold potential for marketers. This year’s tournament is poised to be the most exciting to date for a few reasons: France is still buzzing from its 2018 Men’s World Cup win, while the U.S. women’s team is heavily favored to win this year. Toss in some intense, off-the-field conversations about gender equality, and it’s easy to see why interest in the games is at an all-time high. As marketers, of course, we’re every bit as interested in who is watching the games as who the players are.

The Rise Of Hispanic Products In The U.S. Market

For decades, Hispanic grocers and Hispanic products in mass market grocers have been dominated by food which comes either directly from Latin America or U.S. based companies that try to emulate those of Latin America, like cheeses, spices, and canned goods. There has been little innovation in these products since the 1970s and 80s when Hispanic immigration into the U.S. boomed, and companies responded with products to meet the new discerning consumer who was looking for authentic Hispanic products. Flash forward to 2019, and now immigration from Latin America is at an all-time low, but the U.S. Hispanic population continues to grow at a rapid pace driven primarily by U.S. born Hispanics.

Think Before You (Market Your) Drink To Multicultural Consumers

What’s a little misconception among marketers? Well, in some cases, a minor misconception can lead to a huge missed opportunity. For instance, despite a significant, well-documented increase in multicultural consumers in the U.S., marketers of premium and luxury goods show little interest in this demographic. Why the indifference? It appears to stem from an assumption that the higher their income, the less people are influenced by their culture when making buying decisions. Makers of premium wine, beer, and spirits, for example, are in a prime position to take advantage of the growing opportunity with higher-income multicultural consumers. But to do so, they should consider what role culture plays in the purchasing decision.

Innovations in Survey Methodologies and the Impact on Hispanic Sample

Modern market research has seen four major phases of quantitative survey data collection. During that time, we saw representative samples of U.S. Hispanics emerge and take root in mainstream market research. Let’s take a closer at the evolution of quantitative research and how innovation in the field impacted the widespread use of Hispanic sample.

Self-Referencing Drives Social Media Ad Conversion Among U.S. Hispanics

Latino consumers are younger than the general population, according to Pew Research Center, more digitally connected, according to Think Now Research, and lead the pack in social media usage. According to the 2018 Multicultural Digital Report, at 8:00 p.m. every night, for example, a whopping 70% of Latinos in the $75K-plus income bracket are on social media. This compares to just 55% of non-Hispanic whites in the same earnings segment. Hispanics, along with Asians (each 69%), lead all ethnic groups in daily Facebook usage. Latinos are also top subscribers on Instagram (45%) and Snapchat (34%). And they outperform other groups in using Instant Messenger (62%) and in streaming music (47%).