Hispanic Market Research

/Hispanic Market Research
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[INFOGRAPHIC] The Future of Vehicle Ownership

The rise of micro-mobility and auto technology has changed the landscape of transportation, but a few things remain the same. Consumers still prefer to shop for vehicles in-person and they want to own their cars. These insights and more are found in the ThinkNow 2019 Auto Purchase Trends Report which takes a closer look at vehicle purchases, purchase preferences, and the impact of technology on the industry.

The Rise Of Hispanic Products In The U.S. Market

For decades, Hispanic grocers and Hispanic products in mass market grocers have been dominated by food which comes either directly from Latin America or U.S. based companies that try to emulate those of Latin America, like cheeses, spices, and canned goods. There has been little innovation in these products since the 1970s and 80s when Hispanic immigration into the U.S. boomed, and companies responded with products to meet the new discerning consumer who was looking for authentic Hispanic products. Flash forward to 2019, and now immigration from Latin America is at an all-time low, but the U.S. Hispanic population continues to grow at a rapid pace driven primarily by U.S. born Hispanics.

The Future of Vehicle Ownership: 2019 Purchase Trends

Autonomous Driving and Micro-Mobility Gaining Ground With Consumers It has been two years since we released our last report on auto purchase trends. While 2017 doesn’t seem like that long ago, a lot has changed in the automotive industry. Back then, Lyft was still a private company and Bird was a scrappy start-up. Tesla autopilot wasn’t really autopilot, and Ford was still making sedans. The change in the automotive, and more broadly, the transportation segment since then has been nothing short of amazing. In response to the changes, we’ve released our 2019 Auto Purchase Trends Report which takes a closer look at vehicle purchases, purchase preferences, and the impact of technology on the industry.

Think Before You (Market Your) Drink To Multicultural Consumers

What’s a little misconception among marketers? Well, in some cases, a minor misconception can lead to a huge missed opportunity. For instance, despite a significant, well-documented increase in multicultural consumers in the U.S., marketers of premium and luxury goods show little interest in this demographic. Why the indifference? It appears to stem from an assumption that the higher their income, the less people are influenced by their culture when making buying decisions. Makers of premium wine, beer, and spirits, for example, are in a prime position to take advantage of the growing opportunity with higher-income multicultural consumers. But to do so, they should consider what role culture plays in the purchasing decision.

Socio-Economic Levels in Mexico: Explained

Targeting respondents utilizing socio-economic levels for the sample industry is a ubiquitous practice. Defining socio-economic levels in the U.S. is relatively straightforward. A combination of income and education are the most typical factors used in almost all market research studies. On occasion, some studies add a couple more factors but rarely exceed 3-4 elements. However, defining socio-economic levels in Mexico is much more complicated. As the sample and market research industry continues to grow in Mexico and the rest of Latin America, understanding how socio-economic levels are defined in the region will play a critical role in being successful in winning and fulfilling Mexican market research sample requests.

Think Your Background Doesn’t Influence Your Premium Alcohol Purchases? Think Again

For the first time, a brand development agency that specializes in cross-cultural marketing is bringing the following message to suppliers and advertisers of alcohol who think minority populations shed their social and cultural identities when purchasing premium products: You’re wrong. In response to a belief that most high-end beer, wine and spirits brands promote themselves in a way that’s far too color-blind, WPP’s Geometry, a commercial marketing agency, has partnered with the cultural insights research agency Think Now to survey more than 1,000 Asians, Hispanics, African-Americans and LGBTQ+ individuals living in the U.S. to find out what influences their purchasing decisions. They discovered that background does, in fact, heavily impact their shopping behaviors.

Amazon Cash Banks On Engaging African-American, Hispanic Consumers

Amazon has quietly launched Amazon Cash, a service that allows consumers to purchase products on Amazon without having to use a debit or credit card. In this bold move, the online retail giant strategically positions itself as a resource for the 32.6 million households in the U.S. that don’t use banking services (unbanked) or make limited use of them (underbanked). While Amazon’s overarching strategy is to engage these consumers, who represent 25.2% of the U.S. population, it is also an effort to attract more African-American and Hispanic consumers, who just so happen to be the most likely ethnic groups to be unbanked, according to an FDIC study.

Defining Brand Authenticity Among U.S. Hispanics: Is Being A Latin American Brand Enough?

Special Report Brought To You By Abasto & ThinkNow. The steady growth of the U.S. Hispanic population has caught the attention of the Latin American food and beverage industry. The United States is the second largest Spanish speaking population in the world and represent a sizable opportunity for smaller, more localized Latin American brands to engage with a large pool of consumers more likely to try their products. Successful brands like Bimbo and Novamex have paved the way for other Latin American food and beverage companies aspiring to take up residence in the U.S.

Innovations in Survey Methodologies and the Impact on Hispanic Sample

Modern market research has seen four major phases of quantitative survey data collection. During that time, we saw representative samples of U.S. Hispanics emerge and take root in mainstream market research. Let’s take a closer at the evolution of quantitative research and how innovation in the field impacted the widespread use of Hispanic sample.

Self-Referencing Drives Social Media Ad Conversion Among U.S. Hispanics

Latino consumers are younger than the general population, according to Pew Research Center, more digitally connected, according to Think Now Research, and lead the pack in social media usage. According to the 2018 Multicultural Digital Report, at 8:00 p.m. every night, for example, a whopping 70% of Latinos in the $75K-plus income bracket are on social media. This compares to just 55% of non-Hispanic whites in the same earnings segment. Hispanics, along with Asians (each 69%), lead all ethnic groups in daily Facebook usage. Latinos are also top subscribers on Instagram (45%) and Snapchat (34%). And they outperform other groups in using Instant Messenger (62%) and in streaming music (47%).