African-American Market Research

/African-American Market Research
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Americans Still Unsure About Cannabis, But CPG Brands See Opportunity

Last month, Illinois became the 11th state to allow the adult use of recreational marijuana. Its state legislature is the first to legalize selling the drug. Marijuana remains illegal at the federal level, for now. But that hasn’t stopped blue chip companies from exploring cannabis-based products as many believe that federal legalization in the U.S. is only a few votes away.

The ThinkNow Research Team: Expertise To Power Your Brand

Attracting and engaging consumers paves the road to sales and revenue for companies. Of these consumers, one segment, in particular, will represent more than 50% of the total consumer base within the next 20 years. For companies focusing on younger consumers ages 18-29, this consumer will be more than 50% of all consumers in less than ten years. Chances are, your company, like most, doesn’t understand these consumers despite the significant impact they will have on your company in the future. So, how do you gain insight into an audience with so much potential yet no relationship with your brand? Would you turn to a company focused solely on this consumer or one with a department, or more realistically, a person that heads up a division within a large organization?

[Podcast] Why Brands Can’t Afford to Ignore Social Issues Impacting Black Consumers

In this conversation, we will explore how brands can play a role in addressing social justice issues in the Black American community by helping improve the lives of Black American consumers while driving brand engagement, loyalty, and sales. Speakers: Pepper Miller, Recognized Black American Market Researcher, Author, Subject Matter Expert and Speaker and Reginald Osborne, Strategic Business Leader & Cultural Expert.

2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup: Who’s Watching, Where, and Why

With the not so lofty goal of 1 billion viewers for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, this year’s tournament is poised to be the most exciting to date for a few reasons. France is still buzzing from a Men’s World Cup win in 2017, and the U.S. women’s team is still heavily favored to win this year. But it’s the off the field conversations about gender equality, or the lack thereof, that signal the importance of this year’s games and has helped drive interest to an all-time high. Surprisingly, we know little about who’s watching the games, however. It’s tempting to make assumptions here and just assume that it’s women, but our research tells a different story. We spoke to a nationally representative sample of over 1,200 respondents in the U.S. to help us define the persona of the typical FIFA Women’s World Cup viewer

[INFOGRAPHIC] The Future of Vehicle Ownership

The rise of micro-mobility and auto technology has changed the landscape of transportation, but a few things remain the same. Consumers still prefer to shop for vehicles in-person and they want to own their cars. These insights and more are found in the ThinkNow 2019 Auto Purchase Trends Report which takes a closer look at vehicle purchases, purchase preferences, and the impact of technology on the industry.

The Future of Vehicle Ownership: 2019 Purchase Trends

Autonomous Driving and Micro-Mobility Gaining Ground With Consumers It has been two years since we released our last report on auto purchase trends. While 2017 doesn’t seem like that long ago, a lot has changed in the automotive industry. Back then, Lyft was still a private company and Bird was a scrappy start-up. Tesla autopilot wasn’t really autopilot, and Ford was still making sedans. The change in the automotive, and more broadly, the transportation segment since then has been nothing short of amazing. In response to the changes, we’ve released our 2019 Auto Purchase Trends Report which takes a closer look at vehicle purchases, purchase preferences, and the impact of technology on the industry.

Think Before You (Market Your) Drink To Multicultural Consumers

What’s a little misconception among marketers? Well, in some cases, a minor misconception can lead to a huge missed opportunity. For instance, despite a significant, well-documented increase in multicultural consumers in the U.S., marketers of premium and luxury goods show little interest in this demographic. Why the indifference? It appears to stem from an assumption that the higher their income, the less people are influenced by their culture when making buying decisions. Makers of premium wine, beer, and spirits, for example, are in a prime position to take advantage of the growing opportunity with higher-income multicultural consumers. But to do so, they should consider what role culture plays in the purchasing decision.

Think Your Background Doesn’t Influence Your Premium Alcohol Purchases? Think Again

For the first time, a brand development agency that specializes in cross-cultural marketing is bringing the following message to suppliers and advertisers of alcohol who think minority populations shed their social and cultural identities when purchasing premium products: You’re wrong. In response to a belief that most high-end beer, wine and spirits brands promote themselves in a way that’s far too color-blind, WPP’s Geometry, a commercial marketing agency, has partnered with the cultural insights research agency Think Now to survey more than 1,000 Asians, Hispanics, African-Americans and LGBTQ+ individuals living in the U.S. to find out what influences their purchasing decisions. They discovered that background does, in fact, heavily impact their shopping behaviors.

Amazon Cash Banks On Engaging African-American, Hispanic Consumers

Amazon has quietly launched Amazon Cash, a service that allows consumers to purchase products on Amazon without having to use a debit or credit card. In this bold move, the online retail giant strategically positions itself as a resource for the 32.6 million households in the U.S. that don’t use banking services (unbanked) or make limited use of them (underbanked). While Amazon’s overarching strategy is to engage these consumers, who represent 25.2% of the U.S. population, it is also an effort to attract more African-American and Hispanic consumers, who just so happen to be the most likely ethnic groups to be unbanked, according to an FDIC study.

Defining Brand Authenticity Among U.S. Hispanics: Is Being A Latin American Brand Enough?

Special Report Brought To You By Abasto & ThinkNow. The steady growth of the U.S. Hispanic population has caught the attention of the Latin American food and beverage industry. The United States is the second largest Spanish speaking population in the world and represent a sizable opportunity for smaller, more localized Latin American brands to engage with a large pool of consumers more likely to try their products. Successful brands like Bimbo and Novamex have paved the way for other Latin American food and beverage companies aspiring to take up residence in the U.S.