roykokoyachuk

/Roy Eduardo Kokoyachuk
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About Roy Eduardo Kokoyachuk

Roy is a Managing Partner at ThinkNow Research. He started his career at Warner Bros. Media Research. A desire to pursue multicultural market research full-time led him to join a full service Hispanic & multicultural market research company, in 2003 as Vice President of Advertising Research. He became Executive Vice President in 2006 and opened an operations center in Tijuana, Mexico and directed the company’s entry into online research. In 2009 he initiated the creation of the first nationally representative opt-in market research panel of U.S. Hispanics - CadaCabeza. This panel broke new ground in panel building by focusing on the recruitment of Spanish speaking Hispanics as well as the English speakers typically found on online panels. He co-founded ThinkNow Research to further pursue his passion for multicultural consumer insights.

Is The Asian Market Even A Thing?

With the success of Crazy Rich Asians many brand managers will decide that it’s finally time to start paying attention to this often-overlooked segment. They will find, however, that unlike the U.S. Hispanic or African American markets, there is little consensus as to how to market to Asian Americans. The problem begins with the moniker. Asian Americans are less likely to identify with a pan-Asian identity & more likely to identify with their countries of origin. This is partly due to the more recent immigration status of the majority of Asian Americans (59% are foreign born as compared to 34% for Hispanics) and the dearth of Asian American role models and cultural touchstones in popular media.

[Webinar] ThinkNow Entrepreneurship Report 2018

ThinkNow conducted a national survey of 1,291 Americans aged 18-64 across various ethnic groups. We asked them about their interest in starting businesses, industries chosen, revenue goals, motivations, barriers and utilization of support services. The results are both eye-opening and potentially concerning. Overall, we found that the desire to start new businesses, revenue goals for those businesses and challenges experienced by their founders are not evenly distributed by gender and ethnicity.

[Infographic] Asian American Entrepreneur Outlook 2018

Asian American Entrepreneurs Younger Than Most, Face Challenges There are over 1.9 million Asian-owned businesses in the U.S. accounting for $700 billion in annual receipts. While many Asian Americans pursue entrepreneurship as a means to gain greater independence from traditional expectations, lack of startup capital and uncertainty dampen their efforts.

3 Factors Shaping the Future of Entrepreneurship

Every entrepreneur has his or her reasons for starting a business. As noted in our recent Entrepreneurship In America 2018 report, the “why” ranges from the pursuit of greater independence to leaving behind a family legacy. For me, as co-founder of ThinkNow, I knew there was a better way to gather meaningful insights on hard-to-reach audiences but needed the freedom to do it. The challenges I faced in starting a business, however, are specific to me. It would be a mistake to assume that my experience is reflective of those had by entrepreneurs of different social, ethnic, gender or geographic groups.

Is Entrepreneurship Dying in America?

Women and Minorities Report Greater Obstacles to Starting Businesses Historically, small businesses in the U.S. have fueled the economic engine by supplying a steady stream of new jobs. However, in recent years, new business birth rates have slowed prompting the Kaufman Foundation to declare that startup rates are “half of what they were a decade ago.” This is surprising because the U.S. is seen as a global leader in entrepreneurship. Americans have created whole new industries from scratch through the courage, determination and skill of generations of risk takers. Is America at risk of losing this status? Perhaps, but why? It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact reasons for the overall decline in entrepreneurship in America.

The Persistence of Quantitative Research

Big data, social listening, machine learning and AI are all affecting the market research industry in new and exciting ways. The mind-bogglingly large datasets generated by the digitization of our lives are presenting market researchers the richest data trove ever created by humanity. The sheer abundance of data has prompted many to question whether we’ve entered a “post-survey era” where it no longer makes sense to field quantitative surveys with hundreds or thousands of respondents when data is available on millions.

Millennial Vaccination Habits Vary by Ethnicity

But opinions about early childhood and HPV vaccines contradict. Why the difference? Whenever there is an outbreak of the measles, mumps or some other vaccine preventable infectious disease, we hear a lot about herd immunity – the notion that if 90%-95% of a population is vaccinated infectious diseases cannot get a toehold in a population. This idea, however, may be providing us a false sense of security because for herd immunity to work, vaccinated individuals need to be distributed evenly among a population to act as buffers against transmission and, it turns out, they’re not.

[Infographic] ThinkNow Retail™ Holiday Shopping Report 2017

Innovations In Technology Expected To Ignite A Boon For Retailers This Holiday Season On the heels of startling news of declining in-store sales earlier this year by popular brands and an overall sluggish retail environment, new research reveals that the current situation may not be as dire as it seems. Now in its fifth year, ThinkNow Retail™ in partnership with JElena Group, suggests that the adoption of mobile shopping among the Total Market, especially Hispanic consumers, has changed the dynamic of the consumer shopping experience, but not consumers desire to shop.

Is Trump The Ultimate Market Researcher?

The escalation of rumors that DACA was to be rescinded caused shockwaves throughout the Latino community and beyond. When Jeff Sessions made the official announcement terminating the program, the backlash was loud and swift. Flash-forward to present day fraught with rumors that President Trump may be open to keeping a variation of DACA, pundits, detractors, and supporters alike have labeled him a political flip-flopper. That may or may not be true, but what stood out to me as a market researcher is how Trump has used the ultimate pulpit – the internet – to test ideas and measure a nation’s response.

Specialization Is The Future of Market Research Panels

The meteoric rise of routers, aggregators, and programmatic sampling over the last decade has pushed the boundaries of innovation for delivering online sample. But the same can’t be said for market research panels. Innovation has stalled, boasting minor improvements such as social sign-in, additions of qualitative components to panel infrastructure, and creative incentive solutions. The architecture, however, remains largely in-tact, a near replica of panels past since their advent in the early 2000s. So, the big question for panel is, what’s clogging the innovation pipeline?